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Dye in Norfolk

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Introduction

This page is devoted to the DYE ancestors of my mother - the origins of the name, who they were and where and when they lived.

The genealogical data in these pages is accurate to the best of my current (at the time of writing) knowledge. This means it is of very variable reliability, since sources at one extreme are 100% certain (e.g. I know who I married, where and when, and the identity of my parents) to the mere rumour level, such as LDS data extracted from the IGI and Ancestral File, and reminiscences of elderly relatives, some now deceased. Anyone wishing to make any use whatever of this information is therefore strongly advised to contact me for source details.

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Origins of the name

According to Hanks & Hodges in their A Dictionary of Surnames the surname Dye is derived from a pet form of the mediæval English female given name "Dennis". The smaller book A Dictionary of English Surnames by Reaney & Wilson refers to a pet form of "Dionisia". The even smaller Penguin Dictionary of Surnames agrees, and adds that "Dionisia" is the feminine form of "Dionysius" and so implies a follower of Bacchus.

This latter book also points out that the "fanciful" local place name origin of D'Eye, referring to the place in Suffolk, is at least supported by the frequency of the name in adjacent Norfolk.

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Variants of the name

No variants are listed by any of the three reference book's I consulted..

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Emily Dye

My maternal grandfather's mother Emily DYE was born in the village of West Newton, in north-west Norfolk on 15th October 1845. By the time of the 1851 census the family had moved to nearby King's Lynn, and they were still there at the time of the 1861 census. On 1st June 1868 she married carpenter William John Morgan at the parish church in the Hampshire village of Goodworth Clatford, near Andover. The 1871 census shows the couple living in Union Street, Andover with their son Alfred, then 2 years old and born in Andover.

On 2nd June 1880 Emily was widowed. By that time the family had moved again, this time to Salt Lane, Salisbury, Wiltshire, and there were at least 5 children, shown in the 1881 census as Alfred W. (age 12 at the census date), Hubert M. (age 9), Walter E. (age 7), Emily S.E. (age 4) and Mary O. (age 2).

I am told that, not surprisingly, Emily re-married, this time in Wales where the family remained.

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David Dye

Emily Dye's father was David Dye, born in West Newton, Norfolk about 1817. He married Eliza Rippingale at West Newton parish church and the couple produced at least the three children shown in the 1851 census: Eliza Hannah (the age 11), Martin (age 9) and Emily, who were all born in West Newton. At the time of his marriage, and at the 1851 census (at 3 Horsley Yard, Southgate Street, King's Lynn), he was described as a paper maker, but the 1861 census (also King's Lynn) says he was then an engine driver at a saw mill.

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William Dye

David Dye's father was William Dye, who was baptised in West Newton on 13th May 1769. On 19th June 1792 he married Martha Fox at West Newton parish church. The couple produced at least three children: Joseph (born about 1810), Charles (1813) and David. On his son David's marriage certificate he is described as a labourer.

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Nathaniel Dye

William was the son of Nathaniel Dye and Rosamund (known as Rose) Hemson. They married at West Newton on 15th May 1764 (she was described as a widow). They had at least two children, Margaret (baptised 5th March 1765 at West Newton), and William. Margaret married John Hickling, and they had a son Thomas baptised at West Newton on 3rd August 1793. Rosamund was buried at West Newton on 14th November 1771, following which Nathaniel remarried to Mary Rogers at West Newton on 24th April 1775.

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